Working Together to Improve Our Village Because HSVPOA Matters

HSV Forgotten Relics Uncovered

Staff Works Hard to Restore Grandeur to the Village

As Hot Springs Village celebrates it’s 50th Anniversary, it is only fitting that the Village is undergoing a beauty makeover of sorts. While always beautiful, some of our historic landmarks became a little tarnished over the years. These issues are now being addressed.

Uncleaned Brass Plate at Bridge at Danville Gate/Baleric

Todd Noles, HSVPOA Common Property and Forestry Manager along with Joey Stadler from the HSVPOA Street Department spent several hours Friday, July 24, literally de-tarnishing and restoring the luster of the mostly forgotten, but historic conquistador brass plates on two of the Village bridges. According to Noles, these brass conquistador plates were installed by Cooper when the bridges were originally built.

Time plus a lot of elbow grease yielded beautiful results at the Danville Gate Bridge on Balearic and the bridge crossing over Danville Road at DeSoto. Noles and Stadler vowed to continue this project and revitalize the brass plates on all the bridges. Noles said, “We strive to provide a great experience for our members and guests, working to improve and maintain the beauty of our beautiful community.”

The team used a mixture of ketchup and baking soda along with white vinegar to scrub the tarnished plates. They then followed up with Brasso to polish. The diligent duo worked on one bridge for over three hours.

Click on one of the photographs in the slide show below in order to see a better and larger view of the photographs. The screen will darken. To move through the slide show click the arrow all the way over to the right side of your screen. This action will light up the photographs and make them visible. The caption for the photographs is at the bottom of your screen – not at the bottom of the photo.

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History Behind Conquistador Logo Goes Back to 1541

The word, “conquistador,” means conqueror, especially one of the Spanish conquerors of Mexico and Peru in the 16th century.

Conquistadors were historically important because they charted much of the interior of the New World and made this knowledge available in Europe.

Hot Springs Village in Garland County was previously known as “The Dark Corner” due to the lawlessness of the area at one time.

Here is what “History of Hot Springs Village, Arkansas 1970 – 2000,” says about our past:

The “Dark Corner” of North Garland County where Hot Springs Village is located has a colorful though somewhat obscure history. In prehistoric times, lying just north of the fabled valley of No-wa-sa-lon (the place of healing waters), it was often traversed by bands of Indians who forged trails along the paths of least resistance as they journeyed to the magic springs. Later, according to some historians, the notorious conquistador Hernando DeSoto may have used one of these trails to arrive at Hot Springs in the fall of 1541. This romantic legend, of course, provides the basis for the Spanish theme around which modern builders created the ambient of Hot Springs Village. The main thoroughfare is called DeSoto Boulevard, all the other streets bear Spanish names, and the official logo of the community depicts the helmeted head of a Spanish conquistador.

History of Hot Springs Village, Arkansas
1970 – 2000

Many thanks to all of our staff and volunteers for their hard work in maintaining and keeping our Village beautiful.

By Cheryl Dowden, July 25, 2020

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